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Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) Program

In collaboration with other departments in the College of Engineering, Nuclear Engineering offers a one-year professional master's degree. The accelerated program is designed to develop professional engineering leaders who understand the technical, environmental, economic, and social issues involved in the design and operation of nuclear engineering devices, systems, and organizations. Prospective students will be engineers, typically with industrial experience, who aspire to substantially advance in their careers and ultimately to lead large, complex organizations, including governments.

See The Fung Institute for more details.

 

The interdisciplinary degree requires a minimum of 25 units of coursework in three areas:

  • The core leadership curriculum (8 units)
  • Technical Specialization in NE (minimum 12 units)
  • Capstone project (5 units).

Core Leadership Curriculum (8 units, letter grade, required for degree)

FALL ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP TOPICS (3 units)

  • ENGIN 270A, Organizational Behavior & Negotiations (1 unit)
  • ENGIN 270B, R&D Tech Management & Ethics (1 unit)
  • ENGIN 270H, Accounting & Finance (1 unit)

Designed for Master of Engineering students, these courses explores key management and leadership concepts at the executive level that are relevant to technology-dependent enterprises.  During the courses, students undertake rigorous case study analysis of actual business situations.

SPRING ENGINEERING LEADERSHIP TOPICS (3 units)

Students choose 2 of 4 to meet core requirement.

  • ENGIN 270D, Entrepreneurship (1 unit)
  • ENGIN 270E, Strategy & Analysis (1 unit)
  • ENGIN 270I, Industry Analytics (1 unit)
  • ENGIN 270G, Marketing & Product Management (1 unit)

     Required:

  • ENGIN 270C, Project Management & Teaming (1 unit)

Communications for Engineering Leaders (2 semester units)

1 unit fall, 1 unit spring.  A technical communications course that integrates the capstone project and capstone final paper.  Elements of these project team-based discussion sessions and presentation feedback sessions include:

  • Communications skills training: written (reports) and verbal (presentations)
  • Project problem definition
  • Operational plan for making this project happen
  • Final presentation preparation feedback
  • Capstone Expo preparation feedback
  • 360 Peer Review
  • How to present technical results
  • Guidance for writing the required masters project paper, paper draft review and feedback

Communications for Engineering Leaders (2 semester units)

1 unit fall, 1 unit spring.  A technical communications course that integrates the capstone project and capstone final paper.  Elements of these project team-based discussion sessions and presentation feedback sessions include:

  • Communications skills training: written (reports) and verbal (presentations)
  • Project problem definition
  • Operational plan for making this project happen
  • Final presentation preparation feedback
  • Capstone Expo preparation feedback
  • 360 Peer Review
  • How to present technical results
  • Guidance for writing the required masters project paper, paper draft review and feedback

 

Technical Electives in Area of Concentration (minimum 12 units)

All Technical Electives must be NE graduate level courses (200) and taken for a letter grade.  Units for 298 (seminar) courses do not count for the degree. Study list approval by the Academic Adviser is required each semester.

 

Capstone Project Units (5 units)

5 semester units of ENGIN 296MA-B (letter graded end of spring, required)

  • 1-2 semester units ENGIN 296MA – Fall
  • 3-4 semester units ENGIN 296MB - Spring

The capstone project is a 5-unit course over both the fall and spring semesters.  Students work in teams of 3 to 5 to solve a real-world problem through integration of the depth of knowledge from their technical course work, with the breadth of knowledge from core leadership curriculum.  The capstone projects require teams to develop a solution that meets an industry, market, or social need through experimentation, the creation of new knowledge and teamwork.

Berkeley faculty or industry partners propose capstone projects, and serve as technical advisors for the project team.  Many of the projects will be conducted in a Capstone Experience Class that couples the learning of fundamental tools necessary for a successful capstone in the fall semester with the majority of the project work being done in the spring semester.  Other projects will be independent working directly with faculty or industry research groups throughout the year.  The details of the selection process vary by department but incoming students will apply to their preferred class/projects during the first few weeks of the fall semester, and faculty or industry mentors will make the final team assignments.

Each team will be required to give a 10-minute oral presentation and develop an interactive display as part of the final capstone project showcase in May.  Each team will also be required to submit a team final capstone report.  In addition to these reports, teams must provide interim project deliverables and one final project deliverable to their project advisors.  The nature and form of these deliverables depend on the project and are defined in collaboration with the advisors at the beginning of the project.

All students are required to have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, or higher.